Harvey Weinstein sex scandal: Detailing the allegations

0

close Meryl Streep, Rose McGowan, Ashley Judd and Mark Ruffalo are but a few celebrities speaking out against Harvey Weinstein in the wake of his firing due to allegations of sexual assault.

McGowan, Streep and others speak out on Harvey Weinstein

Meryl Streep, Rose McGowan, Ashley Judd and Mark Ruffalo are but a few celebrities speaking out against Harvey Weinstein in the wake of his firing due to allegations of sexual assault.

Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein, co-founder of film studio The Weinstein Company, was accused of sexually harassing at least eight women in a bombshell Oct. 5 report from The New York Times.

The Times report detailed Weinstein’s alleged sexual misconduct and reported that the mogul had made eight settlements.

After the report was published, Weinstein told the Times in a statement: “I appreciate the way I’ve behaved with colleagues in the past has caused a lot of pain, and I sincerely apologize for it. Though I’m trying to do better, I know I have a long way to go.”

“We are confident in the accuracy of our reporting," a New York Times spokesperson said. "Mr. Weinstein was aware and able to respond to specific allegations in our story before publication. In fact, we published his response in full."

Weinstein later said he planned to sue the Times for $50 million.

On Sunday, three days after the Times' report, The Weinstein Company fired Weinstein "effective immediately" following the "new information about misconduct by Harvey Weinstein that has emerged in the past few days."

Here's what Weinstein has been accused of, based on recent reports.

Thursday, October 5

“Scream” actress Rose McGowan was paid a $100,000 settlement from Weinstein in 1997 following a hotel room incident. The settlement wasn't an admission of guilt, the paper described a legal document as saying.

The Times report also detailed how Weinstein, while in a bathrobe in his hotel room, had asked if he could give actress Ashley Judd a massage or the star could watch him take a shower.

"How do I get out of the room as fast as possible without alienating Harvey Weinstein?" Judd told the newspaper she recalled thinking.

FILE - In this March 18, 2014, file photo, Ashley Judd arrives at the world premiere of "Divergent" at the Westwood Regency Village Theater in Los Angeles. Harvey Weinstein has been fired from The Weinstein Co., effective immediately, following new information revealed regarding his conduct, the company's board of directors announced Sunday, Oct. 8, 2017. The New York Times article chronicled allegations against Weinstein from film star Ashley Judd and former employees at both The Weinstein Co. and Weinstein's former company, Miramax. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP, File)

Actress Ashley Judd is one of the multiple women who came forward and detailed the alleged sexual harassment she experienced from movie mogul Harvey Weinstein. (AP Photo/Jordan Strauss)

In 1998, Zelda Perkins, a former production assistant with Miramax, confronted Weinstein, and told him to stop his “inappropriate requests or comments in hotel rooms,” The New York Times reported.

Perkins, now working as a theater producer in London, was reportedly concerned for other women working in the office, and threatened Weinstein’s behavior with legal action, according to former coworkers.

The Times reported that Miramax negotiated a settlement with Perkins and her lawyer, and Perkins declined to discuss what happened with the newspaper.

Emily Nestor, a temporary employee of Weinstein’s, said he’d made sexual advances to her as well, promising he’d help with her career, according to the report.

Additionally, the Times reported an incident with Weinstein and an unnamed assistant, who he reportedly tried to convince to give him a massage while he stood naked in front of her at a hotel, which left her “crying and very distraught,” according to a memo by Lauren O’Connor.

In O’Connor’s 2015 memo, in which she penned several accounts of women in the company and the atmosphere Weinstein’s advances created, she recalled how Weinstein would ask her to meet with aspiring actresses after they’d have meetings with him in his hotel room.

She wrote how she felt that she was being used to build relationships with “vulnerable women who hope he will get them work.”

Laura Madden detailed to the Times how Weinstein had asked her more than once for massages at hotels and how he would constantly make her re-evaluate herself after rejecting him.

“It was so manipulative,” Madden said. “You constantly question yourself – am I the one who is the problem?”

Ambra Battilana, an Italian model and actress, met with Weinstein at his office in New York’s SoHo neighborhood, the Times reported. But Battilana reportedly called the police hours later saying Weinstein had grabbed her breasts, while asking if they were real, and put his hand up her skirt.

Charges were ultimately not filed against Weinstein, and he and Battilana reportedly agreed to a settlement, according to an anonymous source who spoke with the Times.

Rebecca Traister, a reporter for The Cut, wrote how she encountered Weinstein while covering one of his book parties in early 2000. She claimed he screamed at her for a question she asked, calling her an obscene name.

When her boyfriend and colleague intervened and tried to get Weinstein to apologize to her, she said “Weinstein went nuclear.” He reportedly pushed her boyfriend down a set of stairs and dragged him out to the street in a headlock.

Traister said the altercation was later described as “a case of an aggressive reporter barging into a party she wasn’t invited to and asking impertinent questions.”

Overall, eight women detailed their alleged inappropriate interactions with Weinstein to The New York Times. The report alleges that various employees were asked to perform "turndown duty" for Weinstein, which included getting him ready for bed at night and also waking him up in the morning.

Friday, October 6

Fox 11’s Lauren Sivan on Friday detailed an alleged 2007 encounter with Weinstein in a HuffPost report. Sivan said that while working for local station News 12 Long Island, Weinstein cornered her in the hallway of a Manhattan restaurant closed to the public and masturbated in front of her.

Sivan said she had rejected an attempt by Weinstein to kiss her and told him she had a boyfriend. “Well, can you just stand there and shut up,” she claims he responded prior to allegedly masturbating.

“Luckily I didn't need a job or favor from him + didn't have to be polite,” Sivan tweeted Friday. “Others did. Keep that in mind.”

In another tweet, she said, “For those asking why I waited? YOU try telling that story 10yrs ago. Only possible now because of women with bigger names far braver than me.”

She later spoke about the alleged incident on Megyn Kelly’s NBC show Monday.

In a tweet which has since been deleted, “Shaun of the Dead” actress Jessica Hynes, now 44, recounted an alleged incident involving Weinstein, People reported.

“I was offered a film role at 19,” she reportedly wrote on Twitter. “Harvey Weinstien came on board and wanted me to screen test in a bikini. I refused & lost the job.”

Saturday, October 7

Former model Zoe Brock wrote in a blog post for Medium that in 1997, when she was 23, she was "Harveyed." Brock said she "had no intention of leading" Weinstein on, and "felt safe in his company to be" herself.

Weinstein allegedly tricked her into going to his hotel room, where she found herself with no phone and no cash. He appeared naked and asked her for a massage, she said, adding that she felt "uncomfortable."

Brock eventually, according to her blog post, got Weinstein to let her leave.

Sunday, October 8

The Wrap founder Sharon Waxman claimed in an article that while working for The New York Times in 2004, she “got the green light to look into oft-repeated allegations of sexual misconduct by Weinstein.”

Waxman said she was able to find the man in charge of Miramax Italy. Citing “multiple accounts,” she alleged that “his real job was to take care of Weinstein’s women needs, among other things.”

The Wrap Editor in Chief Sharon Waxman arrives at The Wrap Pre-Oscar party in Los Angeles, California February 22, 2012. REUTERS/Gus Ruelas  (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT) - GM1E82N140W01

The Wrap founder Sharon Waxman said she was working on a story about allegations of sexual misconduct by Harvey Weinstein but the article was eventually "gutted" after "intense pressure" from the movie mogul. (Reuters/Gus Ruelas)

Waxman claimed she was able to find “a woman in London who had been paid off after an unwanted sexual encounter with Weinstein,” she recalled in her piece.

However, Waxman alleged that there had been “intense pressure from Weinstein,” with the article “gutted.”

“The story was stripped of any reference to sexual favors or coercion and buried on the inside of the Culture section, an obscure story about Miramax firing an Italian executive,” she wrote.

“Our former colleague Sharon Waxman wrote about a story that was published in The Times in 2004,” a Times spokesperson told Fox News. “No one currently at The Times has knowledge of editorial decisions made on that story. But in general the only reason a story or specific information would be held is if it did not meet our standards for publication.”

Shares 0

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here